Ronnie05's Blog

Is social media a marketing hyperbole? (Part III)

Posted in Social context, media and advertising by Manas Ganguly on January 28, 2010

Dell is one of the few companies which have driven the social media to their advantage. While such examples are widely acknowledged and appreciated, working out such examples and such business models is tricky.

However, driving social media to one’s advantage isn’t as easy across. The beauty (and the problem) with social media marketing is that it’s a new field. As of now it’s more of an art than a science. I think we just need to see marketing guess/test/refine to find the perfect balance of advertisement and engagement. Also it is important to have the relevant engagement strategy. More often, companies are planning social media for the heck of planning it without a core idea of what they would like the social media to achieve for them. Until a good mix is found we probably will see approaches flounder… when was the last time you clicked on a FB ad?

2009 was also an year of experimentation with Social media launched to drive brands towards perceived relevance. Budgets for most parts were borrowed from other divisions to fund largely experimental programs. In many cases, these Social media programs were introduced without a relevant and integrated strategy and in 84% cases the ROI was not even monitored. In 2010, executives are demanding scrutiny, evaluation, and interpretation. Even though new media is transforming organizations from the inside out, what is constant is the need to apply performance indicators to our work. They want measurable results from social media but the exact implications of social media still evade CMOs.

53% CMOs are unsure about return on Twitter
50% are unable to access the value of LinkedIn.
Source: Bazaarvoice 2009

Most importantly, about 15% believe there is no ROI associated with Twitter, and just over 10% cannot glean ROI from LinkedIn or Facebook. This may be because of a direct disconnect between social media activity and a clearly defined end game. CMOs must establish what we want to measure before we engage. By doing so, Marketing Organizations can answer the questions, “what is it that they want to change, improve, accomplish, incite, etc?”

Quoting Brian Solis, Social Media expert, principal of FutureWorks and author, observer of Social media trends:
The debate over measuring social media investment inspired many brands to cannonball into popular social networks and join the proverbial conversation without a plan or strategic objectives defined. At the same time, the lack of ROI standards unnerved many executives, preventing any form of experimentation until their questions and concerns were addressed.

In 2010, we’re entering a new era of social media marketing — one based on information, rationalization, and resolve.
Business leaders simply need clarity in a time of abundant options and scarcity of experience. As many of us can attest, we report to executives who have no desire to measure intangible credos rooted in transparency and authenticity. In the end, they simply want to calculate the return on investment and associate social media programs with real-world business performance metrics.

Over the years, our exploration and experience has redefined the traditional metrics and created hybrid models that will prove critical to modern business practices and help companies effectively compete for the future.

Thus 2010 would be the year when Social Media Marketing takes on wings but the flight would need a well charted plan, a clear intent and dimensional details of what the Advertisers want to do in the first place. The greater the clarity on these aspects, the better the focus and the definition, the greater the efficiency for the marketers from social media. Unless it is backed by a strategy, intent and proper metrics, a hyped-up approach to social media will only make it a marketing hyperbole.

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2 Responses

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  1. markclayson said, on January 28, 2010 at 12:59 pm

    The posts are useful for many people. They give a lot of necessary information.

  2. […] is the original post: Is social media a marketing hyperbole? (Part III) « Ronnie05's Blog Share and […]


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