Ronnie05's Blog

The tale of two Steves- Bee and Jay

Posted in Computing and Operating Systems, Device Platforms by Manas Ganguly on August 28, 2013

The two Steves- Bee and Jay have been vanguards of technology – and yet the difference between them couldnot have been stark. Everything Jay was Bee wasn’t. Bee’s accomplishments are an antithesis of the achievements of Jay. This is the follow up on my earlier post – Microsoft’s lost decade and it looks down upon (Literally) on Bee’s big judgement errors….

Bee and Jay

A good part of the 90s and early 2000s will be remembered as Microsoft’s decade – and Microsoft was the most dominant force in the technology space, the Alpha-male in technology. The ubiquitous Wintel partnership as it was then however fell behind the Moore’s law and grossly underestimated the migration from desk stationed devices to handhelds. Even while Microsoft had launched its Windows Mobile in 2000 and brought out the first tablet in 2000, Gates, Ballmer & Co misread the shifting sands in personal computing and were unable to capitalize on both these fronts. On hindsight, Microsoft did not open up to the eco-system effects and benefits – and were more happy selling proprietary licenses – A lack of flair and foresight there, which precipitated into a losses that we see today. Put simply – The world has moved faster that Microsoft’s licensed software business model could respond (Analyst Ted Sandler)

Here’s comparing how the two Steve’s measure up on different and yet common device, technology and platform initiatives-

Apple versus Microsoft - the story of two Steves

The list doesnot quite stop there – There’s Microsoft’s wasteful effort on Bing versus Google and its advetures with XBox and Kinect versus Playstation. To me Xbox and Kinect were ideal innovations – but Microsoft and Bee failed to push it… across platforms. Microsoft worked across disparate platforms and was never able to integrate the customer experience across devices and platforms. And then again, projects such as Microsoft courier never saw the light of the day – the plug pulled out through half way.

Bluntly put – Technology is one thing – the ability to conceptualize the portfolio, integrating the services in a manner of user experience that is engaging and habit forming, a layer by layer structured format of business allowing scalability of services and devices into different domains is something that Ballmer missed upon very completely. Take an Apple for instance – It started with an iPod, created a layer of services around it (iTunes), scaled the device into new form factors , upstaged the Music industry, leveraged the design into a smartphone (iPhone), scaled up another service layer (Application Store), upstaged the industry and leveraged it yet again for new device/dimension (iPad) and upstaged the industry all over again – there is this continuity in design, form factor, service, portfolio and monetization streams. Instead Microsoft had a Windows media Player, a Zune, a Zune Media Store, an Xbox and a Kinect, a Surface – they are all great pieces plagued by a discontinuity. The best examples being xBox and Kinect – good innovations, mind numbing possibilities and yet these innovations have struggled to give Microsoft worthwhile mileage.

What they said ... when Steve was asked to retire is not all that great!

What they said … when Steve was asked to retire is not all that great!

Steve (Jay) put the Microsoft problem in a neatly worded statement: “ The trouble with Microsoft is they have no taste. They have no taste and I don’t mean that in a small way, I mean that in a big way.” Absolutely right Steve! Ballmer’s successor clearly has an awful lot of work to do….

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2 Responses

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  1. Murali said, on September 4, 2013 at 11:19 pm

    Hello there

    Wow. U do feel strong about this . Agree on all things but more interesting is why Microsoft went consistently wrong and Jobs did it right every time.
    Focus is the key word and answer. Jobs always looked at the consumer.

    • Manas Ganguly said, on September 17, 2013 at 7:55 pm

      Hi Murali

      Thanks for dropping in and for your comment. apologies for a late response.

      It is possible stepped in the DNA of the companies. Microsoft found success in assembly line production and B2B deals with others such as HP, Dell and others. The monopoly that it enjoyed never incentivized design and user centricity.The intent was mass scale licensed software. So yes, Steve Bee missed the lesson there- which the other Steve learnt the other way – by fundamentally rethinking and redesigning paradigms.

      unfortunately for Apple, it also seems to have lost the zing and the edge. Looking forward to the iWatch for some redemption.

      Cheers!
      Manas


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